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Old 11-08-2011   #12
victim
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: New South Wales
Posts: 3,304
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Ugh, saying you don't want a main character to die is kind of the point. Main characters in television shows, books and films do actually die, quite often in fact. Why isn't it the same in video games? Here we have an entertainment platform that wants to be held to the same standards as that of film and the only thing holding it back is rich, detailed storylines that can have a real affect on the players emotions. Of course you don't want the lead to die, he's your guy and you like him.

Tarantino was brought up by the OP. Pulp Fiction has a great connection to what I'm talking about. I would argue that film has three main characters - Bruce Willis, John Travolta and Samuel L. Jackson, who play Butch, Vincent and Jules respectively - they all have their own stories throughout the film which interweave during separate timelines. If you haven't seen it stop reading now. Butch kills Vincent, which incites an emotional response from the audience but still doesn't make us care less about Butch's plight. Rockstar are known for constantly pushing the barriers between film and videogame, so I expect V to draw heavily on a Pulp Fiction influence if it does indeed go the multiple-characters path.

There's this growing trend in videogames where every playable character has to be extremely likeable. It's a trend that gets broken occasionally - look to L.A. Noire for the best example of this - and while some may argue you need a good leading man in order to have a good story, this is hardly the case. I want to feel the adrenaline of knowing a character could die at any moment, rather than being the invincible space-marine that so many other titles offer.

In order to have the richest and fullest story on offer, videogames have to break down barriers and be a little controversial in their approach to storytelling. The ending of RDR was one of the freshest experiences I have ever felt in a videogame ; it ended the way a film would end.

But that's cool; if you want to play the same thing over-and-over again, you can do that. I personally want to move onwards.
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